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german ww2 dagger??

german ww2 dagger??  appraisal

its about 12 inches long all stainless steel i think. it has a draggon going down the blade with a eagle on the end of the handle. it also has the mark G.C. CO. solingen germany. there is not much else i know about it. so if any 1 knows more about it that would be GREAT!!! thnx.

Category: 
Militaria
Condition: 
Excellent
Medium / Material: 
i think it is stainless steel.
Distinguishing marks: 
it has G.C. CO. on the blade also says solingen germany with a dragon on the blade.
Period: 
ww2 period
Dimensions: 
about 12 inches
Weight: 
1/2 pound maby
History: 
my grandfather gave it ot me and said he got it in ww2 germany.
For Sale: 
No
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250chief's picture
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Very interesting. I don't collect daggers myself, but I was curious so did some quick research.

Every branch (including oddly enough, the post office! Why they would need it I have no idea - tough deliveries maybe?) of the German military and government had it's own style of dagger. They mostly seemed to have similar pommels or handles like yours.

Surprisingly the full eagle topper appears to be most common on the Naval daggers. I would have thought a more nautical theme but apparently not.

I suspect that the extra catch points of the eagle would relegate this to a ceremonial use, most of the working models had smooth medallion decorations so they wouldn't catch on anything.

With scabbard these sell in the high hundreds to low thousands of dollars, from what I can see.

Hope this helps!

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250Chief
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-Primary Vintage and Antique areas of interest:
Bells (brass and glass), Mining Memorabilia
Oil Lanterns, Fire Dept Memorabilia
Railroad Material, Unique Items
Chromatic Glassware

250chief's picture
You cannot vote here
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Very interesting. I don't collect daggers myself, but I was curious so did some quick research.

Every branch (including oddly enough, the post office! Why they would need it I have no idea - tough deliveries maybe?) of the German military and government had it's own style of dagger. They mostly seemed to have similar pommels or handles like yours.

Surprisingly the full eagle topper appears to be most common on the Naval daggers. I would have thought a more nautical theme but apparently not.

I suspect that the extra catch points of the eagle would relegate this to a ceremonial use, most of the working models had smooth medallion decorations so they wouldn't catch on anything.

With scabbard these sell in the high hundreds to low thousands of dollars, from what I can see.

Hope this helps!

--------
250Chief
--------
-Primary Vintage and Antique areas of interest:
Bells (brass and glass), Mining Memorabilia
Oil Lanterns, Fire Dept Memorabilia
Railroad Material, Unique Items
Chromatic Glassware

brandon071502's picture
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hmmm that is very interesting....that would make sence it not being for actual combat. its way to detailed for that. i wonder what the dragon on the blade stands for? well thnx for your comment, it def helps out learning more about what my grandfather gave me.

250chief's picture
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Actually the Dragon is the part that makes sense in a nautical fashion!

Remember, all the old nautical maps had dragons drawn beyond the edge of the known areas. This represented 'there be monsters here' type 'knowledge' or 'the end of the earth so you will fall off an die'. So a blade with the symbol of 'this is the end or the monster part' makes perfect sense!

I also believe that officers had fancier pommels (i.e. leather wrapped, etc.) so your's is probably for a non-commissioned officer (ie bosun). The designs were also usually pretty deep in 'working blades' as the skin of a puncture wound will close around the object to seal the wound. The groove(s) permit air in so that the suction so created won't lock the blade into the wound and it can therefore be withdrawn.

Not knowing your blade in detail, I can't tell you if it's only decorative or functional blade design, but I would suspect decorative.

I would put as much info about Grandpa with it as I could, and try and find as much family history as you can to put with it. Where/How did he get it, etc. Leave room for your name and how you got it too, as well as for future owners. It makes it a much more interesting family history piece then.

--------
250Chief
--------
-Primary Vintage and Antique areas of interest:
Bells (brass and glass), Mining Memorabilia
Oil Lanterns, Fire Dept Memorabilia
Railroad Material, Unique Items
Chromatic Glassware

brandon071502's picture
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another good point! i wish i could get more info from my gandfather, but he passed. but i tell u this much...he sure did have sum good stories for it. i dont think he realized he was telling me different stories evrytime i asked about it. lol. thnx again!!!

Anonymous's picture
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Submitted by Anonymous (not verified)

I bought one similar to this one with a different blade etching and handle. I see others on ebay in the same genre.

I bought mine new in the 1950s at a gun show.

Hope this helps

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